Working Groups

Working groups are forums for members with common professional interests to network, exchange information and promote science based decision making and management of wildlife and its habitats. Working groups publish newsletters, hold meetings, conduct policy analysis, and organize technical symposia and workshops. Whether you're seeking information or are an expert on a subject, working groups have much to offer you, including the opportunity to:

  • Advance your skills in core or emerging areas of the wildlife profession,
  • Advance science about a particular area of concern by the profession,
  • Network with colleagues in your area of expertise,
  • Keep up with the latest information in your professional subdiscipline,
  • Participate in special projects related to your professional interests,
  • Promote science-based policy and management of wildlife and habitats.

To be eligible for membership in a working group you must be a current member of The Wildlife Society. Not a member? Join The Wildlife Society and the working groups of your choice.

Biological Diversity Working Group

The Biological Diversity Working Group provides an opportunity for TWS members to exchange research and management information relative to the conservation of biological diversity and to contribute to the development of policies and programs that promote the conservation of biological diversity. The working group works with other natural resource professionals and TWS working groups to achieve desired goals. The working group encompasses all aspects of biological diversity conservation including landscape ecology, regional planning, sustainable natural resources development/use, protection of threatened and endangered species, and ecosystem, wildlife, and habitat management.

Biometrics Working Group

The Biometrics Working Group promotes the development and application of biometrical methods in the study and management of wildlife resources. The working group provides a forum for TWS members to advance the use of quantitative methods in managing populations and habitats and to explore biometrical techniques and models appropriate to new issues associated with biodiversity, conservation of species, and landscape-level population management. The working group focuses public attention on the importance of biometrical methods in scientific conservation of natural resources and biodiversity.

Climate Change and Wildlife Working Group

The mission of the Climate Change and Wildlife Working Group is to foster research, professional development, and information exchange on contemporary climate change, impacts on ecological systems, and responsive natural resource management for members of The Wildlife Society. Topics of interest to the working group include: direct and indirect impacts of contemporary climate change on wildlife, mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions, best management practices, synergistic threats, monitoring, and strategic conservation. The working group welcomes members from government agencies, universities, nongovernmental organizations, and the private sector.

College and University Wildlife Education Working Group

The College and University Wildlife Education Working Group fosters the professional development of TWS members working as college/university educators, and improves the quality of higher education in wildlife ecology and conservation. The working group provides a forum for communication among educators regarding issues such as curricula, graduate education, innovative teaching approaches, course development, technology in the classroom, improving critical thinking, experiential learning, advising, writing- across-curricula, and peer-review of teaching.

Early Career Professional Working Group

The Early Career Professional Working Group is a new working group dedicated to addressing the challenges and opportunities that early career wildlife professionals encounter. We welcome the full spectrum of wildife professionals to contribute to our efforts. Contact: Kristina Boyd ecpworkinggroup@gmail.com.

Ethnic and Gender Diversity Working Group

The Ethnic and Gender Diversity Working Group promotes the involvement of minorities and women in the wildlife and natural resource professions, especially in areas such as student recruitment, conservation education, and professional development. To expose a broader range of students to natural resource career opportunities, the working group focuses on young students before they have formulated their career paths.

Forestry and Wildlife Working Group

Forest management decisions affect a large array of wildlife species and habitats. The impacts that forestry has on wildlife occur at multiple spatial scales and range across ownership types including National and State Forests, industrial timberlands, and small private woodlots. The purpose of the working group is to provide a forum for TWS members with common professional interest to communicate, exchange information, facilitate continuing education, and increase public awareness on matters related to the impacts of forest management on wildlife.

Human Dimensions Working Group

The Human Dimensions Working Group promotes the study and transfer of information relative to human dimensions, social aspects, and policy related to wildlife management. The working group enhances knowledge and technical capabilities of wildlife professionals and increases awareness and appreciation of public involvement in wildlife management. The working group discusses such topics as hunting/trapping of wildlife populations, stakeholder input processes, and public attitudes toward wildlife and wildlife habitat conservation/protection.

Hunting, Trapping, and Conservation Working Group

The primary goal of the Hunting, Trapping, and Conservation Working Group is to explore hunting and trapping relative to conservation and management of wildlife resources. 

International Wildlife Management Working Group

The International Wildlife Management Working Group provides a forum for TWS members to network with wildlife professionals from around the world on a wide range of issues pertaining to wildlife management and habitat conservation. The working group provides an opportunity to exchange information with colleagues worldwide and to seek technical assistance from other countries when local expertise is not available. The working group reaches out to wildlife professionals in all areas of the world to offer the collective expertise of The Wildlife Society in an international context.

Invasive Species Working Group

The Invasive Species Working Group promotes the control, mitigation, and prevention of invasive species’ introduction to improve natural resources for wildlife. Invasive species management is a very controversial topic, with feral hogs and cats, fire ants, turtles, brown tree snakes, and invasive fish and plants being at the forefront. This working group hopes to include representatives from government agencies, the private sector, and academia to disperse information via listserv, website, newsletters, workshops, and meetings.

Military Lands Working Group

The Military Lands Working Group is intended to provide opportunities for members to exchange information, meet professionals dealing with similar situations, and promote awareness of natural resource conservation requirements on Department of Defense lands. Contact: Rhys Evans sirsnave@verizon.net and Chris Eberly ceberly@dodpif.org.

Molecular Ecology Working Group

The Molecular Ecology Working Group aims to promote scientific advancement applying molecular techniques to wildlife ecology, management, and conservation.  The group seeks to enhance awareness of molecular ecology & genetic applications to wildlife biology, and act as an informational and networking resource.  The working group is intended to be broadly inclusive of the various aspects of molecular ecology that may be applicable to wildlife (e.g. genetic and genomic methods, conservation genetics, non-invasive genetic population monitoring, landscape genetics, evolutionary genetics, molecular forensics, and many more).

Native Peoples' Wildlife Management Working Group

The Native Peoples' Wildlife Management Working Group promotes improved relationships between state/provincial/federal wildlife managers and tribal wildlife managers through improved communications. The working group provides a forum for tribal and agency wildlife professionals to discuss wildlife management on reservations and aboriginal lands and to share viewpoints on proposed policies affecting wildlife management on those lands. The working group works to enhance wildlife management on and off reservations through joint activities.

Public Conservation Education and Outreach Working Group

The Public Conservation Education and Outreach Working Group works to instill and foster a land ethic and an understanding of ecological principles among today's citizens. It provides a forum for TWS members to cooperate in helping build public support for wildlife management programs. The working group provides for the exchange and advancement of ideas in elementary and secondary curricula, development of innovative outreach programs, infusion of critical learning skills in conservation education, conservation and environmental writing, and teaching techniques.

Rangeland Wildlife Working Group

The Rangeland Wildlife Working Group promotes unified efforts in managing rangelands for both wildlife and livestock sustainable use.  It provides a forum for members who may have dual interests in other related professional societies or in multi-purpose land management to build support for symposia, outreach, special projects, information exchange, and networking of members who work toward a common goal.  As a newly formed working group, initial efforts will include developing plans for collaborative projects, such as a symposium at the 2014 TWS Conference, highlighting current issues in the rangeland field as they relate to managing key wildlife species.

Renewable Energy Working Group

The Renewable Energy Working Group will focus on wildlife and ecological issues associated with the siting, construction, and operation of renewable energy generating facilities. As the U.S. moves toward energy independence the growth of wind, photovoltaic, and other solar technologies will require large areas for energy production. Along with the growth, comes multiple issues for wildlife management.

Spatial Ecology and Telemetry Working Group

The Spatial Ecology and Telemetry Working Group provides an opportunity for TWS members to address issues of concern to the GIS community and to advance their own skills and understanding of GIS, remote sensing, and telemetry technologies. The working group functions as a clearinghouse of information and expertise in the area of GIS, remote sensing, and telemetry for TWS Council, TWS sections and chapters, and individual TWS members. The working group includes, but is not limited to, GIS users, remote sensing specialists, telemetry practitioners, cartographers, and landscape ecologists.

Student Development Working Group

The Student Development Working Group promotes increased student awareness of TWS membership benefits, works to expand knowledge and technical capabilities of student members, and helps prepare student members for professional wildlife careers. The working group facilitates networking between students and experienced TWS members by hosting meetings, workshops, poster sessions, a mentoring program, and a student chapter leaders’ breakfast. The working group also selects the recipient of The Wildlife Society’s Student Chapter Advisor of the Year Award.

Urban Wildlife Working Group

The Urban Wildlife Working Group provides a forum for TWS members to exchange information relative to urban wildlife and the management of urban wildlife habitat. The working group works to increase awareness of urban wildlife, resolve conflicts related to nuisance wildlife concerns, and promote opportunities to incorporate wildlife in urban settings among urban planners, landscape architects, the private sector, and the general public.

Wetlands Working Group

The purpose of the Wetlands Working Group is to provide a forum for TWS members with common professional interest to communicate, exchange information, facilitate continuing education and increase public awareness on matters and issues which impact, or may impact wetlands and associated wildlife species and to promote and enhance the responsible management of wetland resources through annual meetings, webinars, newsletters, scientific publications, and other forms of communication.

Wildlife Damage Management Working Group

The Wildlife Damage Management Working Group promotes better understanding of the challenges of managing human-wildlife conflicts and provides a forum for TWS members to advance their skills and knowledge of wildlife damage management practices. The working group provides networking and communication opportunities for wildlife professionals working in management, research, education, and administration of wildlife damage management concerns.

Wildlife Diseases Working Group

The Wildlife Diseases Working Group provides a forum for networking and communication among wildlife professionals interested in management, research, education, and administration of wildlife disease issues. The working group serves as a clearinghouse for information and expertise on wildlife diseases for TWS members, government agencies, and other professional organizations. The goals of the working group are to enhance awareness and understanding of research and management on wildlife diseases and of how increased interactions between wildlife, humans, and domestic animals that result from globalization impact wildlife populations and human economies.

Wildlife and Habitat Restoration Working Group

The Wildlife and Habitat Restoration Working Group provides a forum for TWS members to share experiences, techniques, and information relative to restoring wildlife populations and degraded habitats. The working group explores methods for implementing ecosystem management principles that enable whole communities to recover and seeks to identify effective monitoring and evaluation programs to determine successes and failures of restoration techniques.

Wildlife Planning and Administration Working Group

The Wildlife Planning and Administration Working Group promotes improved management effectiveness within natural resource agencies and organizations. The working group provides wildlife managers, educators, and administrators with the skills, techniques, and networking abilities to achieve advances in organizational management. The working group provides a forum for Society members to share ideas and information on natural resource policy issues, comprehensive management systems, computerized information systems, trends analysis, effective decision making, consensus building, and other topics associated with organizational management.

Wildlife Toxicology Working Group

The Wildlife Toxicology Working Group works to bring greater awareness and understanding of the risks posed to wildlife populations as a result of chemical contaminants in the environment. The working group assists TWS members in advancing their knowledge of the principles of wildlife toxicology and procedures for responding to wildlife kills or major exposures of wildlife to environmental contaminants. The working group conducts special sessions and workshops at The Wildlife Society’s Annual Conference and other forums.

Working Group for the Steady State Economy

The Working Group for the Steady State Economy educates fellow TWS members, other natural resources professionals, the public, and policy makers on the fundamental conflict between economic growth and wildlife conservation. It uses a variety of forums including academic symposia, public meetings, and letters to newspaper editors. The working group also has a scientific function in helping lead the wildlife profession into the emerging field of sustainability science.